Why Has Oxycontin Become a Street Drug?

Why Has Oxycontin Become a Street Drug?

Oxycontin is usually a kind of Oxycodone which is distributed as a time released pain killer. The drug is classified as a Schedule II Controlled Substance because of the high probability of being addicted to the substance. While the drug is only available by doctor’s prescription, it is increasingly more available on the streets for addicts to obtain from suppliers.

Although Oxycontin is known as a time release substance made to be ingested whole, addicts will crush or chew up the capsule to get around the time release. When the tablet is mashed, it’s snorted through the nose, like cocaine. The drug might be diluted in water and injected into the veins too. These techniques of changing the tablet cause quicker, more intensive highs.

After a while, the entire body will build up a ceiling for the substance, making it necessary for addicts to increase the dosage to obtain the high feeling. Creating a tolerance to the drug is quite dangerous because after the drug is consumed in higher amounts, the likelihood of overdosing multiply. Due to the fact Oxycontin depresses the nervous system, overdoses will close down the respiratory system and cause future death if they are not treated quickly. Other indications of Oxycontin overdose include things like: seizures, coma, and confusion, loss of awareness, difficulty breathing and vomiting.

Oxycontin has changed into a street drug because of the quite a few users who are looking for illegal ways of obtaining the prescription substance. While physicians won’t prescribe additional tablets after realizing that their patients are mistreating the drug, addicts are left dealing with withdrawal and definitely will pay out higher prices to obtain the pills on the street.

To ensure that the drug to be found on the street, there must be a method in which the dealers obtain the pills. There have been cases noted where pharmacists have stolen pills from the pharmacy and offered them to dealers for profit. In other cases, teenagers have raided their parent’s medicine cabinets and offered the leftover prescription pills for the money as well. These two steps lead to Oxycontin being offered to be a street drug.

Fighting an oxycontin addiction surely requires the assistance of a detox facility due to significant withdrawals you encounter as the drug leaves your body. One user described the withdrawal stating that he felt like his skin was burning and his bones were melting. This alone signifies that the medication is efficient at addiction. An addict may neglect areas of his life to take the drug, in addition to telling lies and stealing.

Detox is the better answer for weaning yourself away from oxycontin. By permitting a physician to manage your doses so that the dosage will become minimal and finally ceases, you are relinquishing control but battling your addiction also. As soon as the drug is out of the body, treatment in the form of rehab will probably be necessary; otherwise the likelihood of relapse vastly rise. Because the drug is capable of destroying your life, the sooner you obtain help, the sooner it is possible to go forward with your life.

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