Heroin Withdrawal

Heroin Withdrawal

Summary of Heroin

Heroin is an illegal, opioid drug derived from morphine, a substance that originates from the seed in the opium poppy plant. It is normally located in Southeast or Southwest Asia, Columbia as well as Mexico. As a result of the intense feelings it causes in the body, it can be incredibly addictive to use heroin, even after using it one time.

“The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relieversheroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl—is a serious national crisis that affects public health as well as social and economic welfare.”

Signs of Heroin Usage

  • Happy feelings
  • Upset stomach as well as throwing up
  • Dry mouth
  • Itching
  • Warm, purged skin
  • Going in and out of sleepiness
  • Foggy thoughts or memories
  • Limbs that feel heavy

Heroin Withdrawal

Every person is impacted by a heroin withdrawal differently, however many people will agree that it causes the body to go into a state of shock, as well as experience uncomfortable signs and symptoms that will emerge, rapidly after the last dose taken.

Symptoms of Heroin Withdrawal

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation
  • Diarrhea
  • Pupils that are dilated
  • Sweating
  • Anxiety
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Muscle aches and pains

Period of Withdrawal

The time period that heroin withdrawal will last depends on lots of variables including:.

  1. The length of time the person has used heroin
  2. Underlying clinical or psychological illness
  3. The method in which they took heroin
  4. How regularly heroin was used by the person
  5. The amount of heroin the person took each time

Withdrawal of Heroin Timeline

Every person will withdrawal from a heroin differently, relying on lots of factors including the type of medication, exactly how it was made, as well as the individual’s medical history. Below are some basic standards on the timeline of what an individual’s withdrawal will resemble:

Days 1-2

Symptoms of withdrawal can occur as quickly as within 6 hrs of the last dosage taken. Generally, the very first day will start with muscle mass pains and also discomforts that can become more extreme over the course of 48 hours. Other signs and symptoms during this duration can include anxiety, depression, shaking, diarrhea, and panic attacks.

Days 3-5

By days 3-5 the signs will be in full speed, as well as individuals can experience lots of uncomfortable negative side-effects. A few of these signs consist of sweating, shivers, nausea/vomiting and abdominal cramping.

Days 6-7

This stage normally is when “severe withdrawal” ends and signs and symptoms begin to reduce. Although, most individuals going through withdrawal will feel exhausted as well as worn down, the other symptoms will start to fade as well as get better.

Post-Acute Effects

Because of the neurological changes that heroin has on the brain, symptoms of withdrawal may remain in place for months after the “acute” withdrawal phase. Some common signs that may be resilient are anxiousness, fatigue, clinical depression, sleeplessness, impatience, and depression.

Detoxing from Heroin

Many people find it a difficult to conquer a heroin addiction since the withdrawal signs and symptoms are unsettling and extreme. A heroin cleanse or detoxification can make a person feel so uncomfortable to the point that they believe they are dying. People who have experienced withdrawals report very similar experiences: pains, aches (especially in the legs), extreme flu-like signs, stomach pains, severe need to use heroin, sweating, excessive mucous production (runny nose), clinical depression, diarrhea, reduced blood pressure as well as irritability.

Heroin Overdose

A dangerous and also often deadly effect of using heroin is overdose. Because of the different chemicals, quantity of chemicals and type of heroin being used, it can be challenging to understand exactly what an individual is putting in their body. This puts them at a higher risk for overdose, than for a person who knows exactly what they are getting.

“A large dose of heroin depresses heart rate and breathing to such an extent that a user cannot survive without medical help. Naloxone (e.g., Narcan®) is an opioid receptor antagonist medication that can eliminate all signs of opioid intoxication to reverse an opioid overdose.”

Naloxone was authorized by the United States Drug Administration (FDA) in 2014 in the form of a hand-held auto injector that supplies the individual with a single dose in the muscle tissue or arm which provides more time to get the medical help needed to assist them through the drug reversal period.

Dependency to Heroin

Heroin produces an extremely addictive, relaxing feeling in the body which makes it really hard to give up using, for some people also after one time using the drug. Addiction can occur quite quickly, along with excruciating withdrawal symptoms that occur when a person attempts to stop using, making it even more of a challenge to stop.

“The number of people meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for dependence or heroin use disorder increased dramatically from 214,000 in 2002 to 626,000 in 2016.”

The boost of increased cases of heroin use problem is rather startling, making it important to obtain assistance today for an addiction. Choosing a residential treatment program to manage your heroin addiction therapy will allow you to begin to address the underlying root causes of dependency via counseling, helping you to begin the healing process as well as start your sober life in the right direction.

Treatment for Heroin Addiction

There are numerous treatment protocols that have been proven to be effective in treating a heroin dependency or addiction problem in people. One of the most commonly used forms of treatment are behavior modifications and also medicines that help manage the withdrawal signs and symptoms and alleviate the discomfort of discontinued use.

“Although behavioral and pharmacologic treatments can be extremely useful when utilized alone, research shows that for many people, integrating both types of treatments is the most effective approach.”

The best strategy to use when treating someone for heroin use is to perform an analysis and/or evaluation to determine the best mode of treatment for the individual person. Every case and scenario are different and also the method of treatment required needs to be adjusted for each and every person to meet their needs.

If you or a someone you know is dealing with an addiction problem, inpatient or residential treatment could be best for you. Please contact a heroin treatment center near you right away. Assistance for your addiction is just a telephone call away.

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