Alcoholism in women

Alcoholism in Women

The general image that comes to one’s mind when he/she encounters the word alcoholism is the image of a man. That’s a stigma of society that only men are capable of becoming alcoholics. However, the trend has changed and society has to accept the fact that currently, more and more women are becoming the same as men to get addicted to alcohol. However, there’s still a particular stigma, a particular kind of toxic shame, about a woman and alcoholism — that promotes denial. It’s much harder for a woman to admit to alcoholism than it is for a man to admit to it. Therefore, the death rate from alcoholism, percentage-wise, on alcoholism in women is higher than it is in men who have alcoholism.

Alcoholism is a disease that happens irrespective of age, class, socio-economic status, etc. As they say in treatment recovery, alcoholism is a autonomous disease. It’s very hard to acknowledge that one’s mother is alcoholic. You put a string of pearls around her neck, she has children who are professionals, and she goes to church — and nobody wants to see that that woman is alcoholic. But the truth is, alcohol does not select. Anyone could be party to alcohol addiction. And among women, any woman of any profession is likely to become an alcoholic.

Women appear to be more vulnerable than men to many adverse consequences of alcohol use. Females achieve larger concentrations of alcohol in the blood and become more impaired than men after drinking equivalent amounts of alcohol. Research also suggests that women are more susceptible than men to alcohol-related organ impairment and to trauma following traffic crashes and interpersonal violence. In addition, the metabolization and absorption of alcohol is different in men and women. In general, women have less body water than men of similar body weight, so that women achieve higher concentrations of alcohol in the blood after drinking equivalent amounts of alcohol. However, on an interesting note, the elimination of alcohol in the blood is faster in women than in men. This finding may be discussed by women’s higher liver volume per unit of lean body mass, because alcohol is metabolized almost entirely in the liver.

What damages does alcoholism in women bring?

Compared with men, women develop alcohol-induced liver disease over a shorter period of time and after consuming less alcohol. In addition, women are more likely than men to develop alcoholic hepatitis and to die from cirrhosis. Animal research has discovered that women’s increased risk for liver damage may be linked to physiological effects of the female reproductive hormone called estrogen. Furthermore, views of the brain found by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tells that women may be more susceptible than men to alcohol-induced brain damage. Using MRI, researchers established that a brain region involved in coordinating multiple brain functions was significantly lesser among alcoholic women compared with both nonalcoholic women and alcoholic men.

On a certain survey of female college students, it has given details on what are the social and psychological effects of alcoholism in women. The survey found out that there is a significant relationship between the amount of alcohol the women reported drinking each week and their experiences of sexual victimization. In a different study found that female high school students who used alcohol in the previous year were more likely than non-drinking students to be the victims of dating violence.

In alcohol addiction, there are many aspects that are being connected to women’s susceptibility. One is genetic factor. Studies of women who had been adopted at birth have shown a major association between alcoholism in adoptees and their biological parents. In addition, antisocial personality (e.g., aggressiveness) in biological parents may predict alcoholism in both male and female adoptees. However, potential interactions between genetic and environmental influences need further study. Moreover, results of a large nationwide survey show that more than 40 percent of persons who initiated drinking before age 15 were diagnosed as alcohol dependent at some point in their lives. Percentages of lifetime dependence slowed down to about 10 percent among those who began drinking at age 20 or older. Physical abuse during adulthood has also been associated with women’s alcohol use and related problems. In a certain study, finds that significantly more women undergoing alcoholism treatment experienced severe partner violence (e.g., kicking, punching, or threatening with a weapon) compared with other women in the community.

Alcoholism in women has different effects as compared to alcoholism in men.

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